Training Tools for Dogs

The behaviour you’re trying to teach your dog will affect the tools that you use for training. Whether you’re actively working on behaviour or just trying to get out on a walk with less frustration, a variety of humane and functional equipment exists to assist you with your goals. (more…)

Response to Edmonton Humane Society’s Announcement Regarding Animal Protection Department

Media Release – January 23, 2019

Calgary, AB — Immediate Release

 

We are surprised and saddened to hear about the decision by Edmonton Humane Society to close its Animal Protection department. Calgary Humane Society recognizes the importance and value in having Peace Officers who help to fulfill our mandate of protecting animals in the City of Calgary by enforcing the Alberta Animal Protection Act.  Humane Societies and SPCAs are in a unique position to be able to provide these services to the community and help save animals from situations of neglect and cruelty.  It will be very difficult to fulfill the mandate embedded in their name (Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) without also being able to do this targeted education and enforcement work. We imagine this must have been a very difficult decision for Edmonton Humane Society and its Board of Directors.

5 Household Items that may be Harming Your Pets

Many of us don’t realize the dangers lurking in our own homes! Our pets can be very sensitive to some common household products. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most dangerous items that you may have in your house that could be harming your pets.

1. Essential Oils

Essential oils are never okay for cats. Cats cannot metabolize any essential oils and they should not be consumed by your cat, applied topically, or diffused into the air. For cats, there is no safe amount of dilution. Essential oils will build up in their system since they are unable to metabolize and get rid of them, and this can cause serious health problems. You can read more about essential oils and cats here. If you must diffuse oils in your home with a cat, ensure they are safely in another room. However, even this is not recommended.

Any oils used around or on a dog should be heavily diluted, although some are not safe at any dose. Dogs also have a strong sense of smell and may be irritated by the oils. Essential oils should never be applied topically without being diluted and could cause chemical burns to a dog’s skin if used in too high a concentration.

Never use any essential oils on or near your animal without checking with your regular veterinarian first.

2. Leftover food

Most people know that chocolate is bad for dogs, but did you also know that onions, some artificial sweeteners (like xylitol), garlic, apricots, chives, leeks, grapefruit, limes, macadamia nuts, oranges, peaches, and rhubarb are toxic to dogs too? So are many other things listed here on the Pet Poison Helpline website. It is always safest to feed your pet a healthy, balanced pet food, rather than scraps off of your plate.

3. Plants

Consuming household plants can lead to an upset stomach and vomiting. Some plants in particular are poisonous to your furry friend, including: tomato plants, geraniums, mint, oregano, all forms of lillies including peace lillies, tulips, camomile, poinsettias, peonies, and mums. Plant fertilizer, bulbs, and mulch can also cause harm to your pet if they have a habit of digging up your garden and ingesting these items.

For a full list of toxic plants, check out this helpful resource.

4. Items in your garage

Many items that are present in your garage, like antifreeze, things that expand like glue or spray foam, engine oil, de-icing salt, batteries, insecticides, tools, and other items can be dangerous to your pet. Small screws and bits of wire or twine can also be harmful if ingested. Animals can also harm themselves on saws or other sharp objects. It is very important to organize these items in locked cabinets or on high shelves if your animal is going to spend any time in your garage or shed.

5. Recreational and prescription drugs

It should go without saying that any medication should be kept out of reach of pets. Even your pet’s own medication should be kept in a safe, pet-proof place until it is time for them to take it.  With the legalization of marijuana in Canada, it is also important to keep recreational drugs away from your pet. THC, a component in cannabis plants, is toxic to pets.

If you ever suspect that your pet has consumed something that it shouldn’t have, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

Can Housesoiling be Cured?

Housesoiling does not have to be a forever problem! In fact, we find many cats that were surrendered for housesoiling in one home do not have this issue in their foster homes or with their new families. There are many factors that can contribute to a cat urinating or defecating outside their litterbox. Thankfully this is often a problem that can be solved.

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Preventing Lyme Disease in Pets

There is some relief when mosquito season is over, but fall has a different pest problem in Canada: ticks. While young ticks are prevalent in spring, adult ticks are most active in the autumn. Deer ticks are on the rise in Alberta with up to 20% of ticks screened testing positive for Lyme disease.

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Carve Your Own Spooky Animal Pumpkin

We’ve created some animal pumpkin templates for you to use this Halloween! We would love to see your finished carvings, so be sure to send us a picture on our Facebook page when you’re finished. Happy Halloween!

 

You will need:

  • A printer with plain white paper
  • Pumpkin
  • Scissors
  • Long-handled spoon
  • A tack, pin, nail or other sharp object
  • Carving knife

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Conviction in Severe Neglect Case

Media Release – October 17, 2018

Calgary, AB — Immediate Release

On October 16, 2018, Amanda POLLOCK, 21, of Calgary, AB was convicted of Animal Protection Act Offences and sentenced to a $1,500 fine and a 10 year prohibition, limiting her to four spayed/neutered dogs with clauses requiring the annual submission of veterinary reports and allowing peace officer monitoring.

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Foster Parent Q&A

You can make a huge difference in an animal’s life as a foster parent for Calgary Humane Society. These animals require a little bit of extra attention, love, and socialization outside the shelter. If you don’t have the time to volunteer with us but would still like to be involved, opening your home to a foster pet is a great way to assist us in our mission to help as many animals as we can.

We often receive questions about what it takes to be a foster parent, from the time commitment, to the type of home, to the level of knowledge required. Being a foster parent isn’t always easy, but it is something that can fit within most lifestyles!

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CHS Supporter: Meet Mieke

You may have read about our incredible CHS supporter, Mieke and her event Bark with Bam, in our latest issue of Connecting Lives. We are so grateful to have Mieke’s generous support and to be involved with Bark with Bam each year.

Today we are sharing our full interview with Mieke about how she started volunteering and her history with Calgary Humane Society. Thank you for being an undisputed champion for the animals!

Mieke and Rambo

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DIY Canine First Aid Kit

Situations that may require a canine first aid kit could include emergencies such as a fire or flood, or your dog getting hurt or lost.  In this blog post we’re providing a list of items to include in your dog’s first aid kit so you’ll always be prepared for the worst.

 

Being prepared for an emergency with your animal is very important and a vital part of responsible pet ownership! While we hope to never have to use a first aid kit with our pet, having these items on hand is invaluable in case of an emergency and can help you save valuable time if your pet is in distress.

Many items in this DIY Canine First Aid Kit are available from pet supply stores, including our Pet Gear Store at Calgary Humane Society, the dollar store, or even some large grocery stores.

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